Recently Created Art by Maureen Riley


Previous Image
Prev
Return To Thumbnails
Thumbnails
Large View
Enlarge
Next Image
Next

Fireplace screen with relief sculpture. Fireplace screen is a new work - and it allows for custom work - any size and any subject could work in this presentation. Please contact us for more information. 734 904 3602 msrileystudios@charter.net -Recently Created Art by Maureen Riley
Fireplace screen with relief sculpture.

Fireplace screen is a new work - and it allows for custom work - any size and any subject could work in this presentation. Please contact us for more information. 734 904 3602 msrileystudios@charter.net



We have developed a fireplace screen that is designed with clean lines which acts as a blank canvas for limited edition and custom relief sculptures.


The Zennor Fox


The first design to be introduced is "the Zennor Fox".

The story of the Zennor fox is one of those lovely hunting stories. This particular story was told by Sir A. J. Munnings and took place in 1913 with the Western Hounds near Zennor Hill.

"... I cannot leave out of these reminiscences the story of an end to one of these hunting days, when a fox ran to the cliff d days, when a fox ran to the cliff days, when a fox ran to the cliff days, when a fox ran to the cliff. It was a late afternoon in December. A small group of dismounted hunt followers and the huntsman, Tom Mollard, stood looking down where the fox had gone.

The cliffs were not steep, or difficult to descend, and soon the whip Jack and I had descended below, where the fox was curled up on a high rock, silhouetted against the sea behind him. Before I could stay his hand, Jack had flicked the fox with the lash of his whip, and with a sharp bark it jumped into the sea.

There were we watching the fox swimming for his life, and being lifted with a swell almost onto the rocks, and then dragged back again in the backwash until a wave, larger than the rest, landed him safe and there he clung. As the water left him, he looked like a small greyhound, with his sodden coat close to his side. The fox shook himself. Springing up to the next ledge, he climbed on and up, until finally he went into a wide crevice of the cliffs."

"Come on, Mr. Munnings," said Jack. "Let`s go and get him out."

"No, Jack, we don`t. That fox has run for his life and has saved himself. We`re going to leave him alone." I replied.

"What will Tom say?" he asked.

I replied that I didn`t care.

When we met Tom at the top of the hill, his response to Jack`s story of the events was, "That`s the last time we`ll ever let Mr. Munnings go down after the fox."


Those who stood above watching the escape of the fox agreed with my sentiments. Seeing the fox struggling in the sea below, their suspense, they told me, became almost unbearable, and they felt like shouting for joy when they saw him saved by the large wave. What would Tom Mollard have thought of this expression of human weakness in the followers of the chase?"

I felt that the story of the Zennor fox needed to be remembered. It tells the story of the fox but more than that it tells of people`s love for a good day of sport and a sense of fair play. I have chosen to show the fox quietly warming itself by the fire, and there it is, a story well told.

Site Relevance: sporting dog art and countryside sport art, western art, dog sculptures, 19th century sporting dog painting, Annie Oakley, Buffalo Bill, gun dogs, bison, horses, mustang, Bronze Sculptures,